Thursday, January 22, 2015

Participatory Data: Public or Private?

Participatory 3D modelling (P3DM) is a community-based process centred, which integrates local spatial knowledge with data on elevation of the land and depth of the sea to produce physical 3D models. Residents of a given area assemble a 3D model of the territory they rely on for their livelihoods and cultural practices. P3DM is used for a number of purposes and addresses a range of issues including spatial planning, land tenure, climate change adaptation, intergenerational knowledge exchange, building community identity, documenting local knowledge for advocacy purposes, and more.

P3DM has been used mostly in developing countries in rural areas. A P3DM exercise covering an area of 1000 km2 at a 1:10000-scale lasts approximately 10 days and involves 50-100 knowledge holders. The resulting 3D map stores a huge amount of geo-located data, matching a well-defined legend. The legend - developed by the local communities - includes point, line and polygon data; it reflects local and traditional knowledge of all sectors of society, including women and elders. Free Prior Informed Consent (FPIC) obtained, data displayed on the 3D model are imported into GIS environments and further analysed and compared with other data sets. Depending on the scale used, a P3DM exercise may generate up to 80 layers of information including land cover, resource use and tenure, social infrastructure, settlements, sites of cultural significance and more. Some data may be considered as sensitive by the knowledge holders and treated as confidential (i.e. removed from the model or stored as classified layers in a GIS). Custodians of data (usually NGOs operating on behalf of communities) should manage these according on ethical principles and agreed procedures.

P3DM works best at 1:5000 – 1:10000 scale or larger. The larger the scale (1:5000 is larger than 1:10,000), the more detailed and diversified the input of the knowledge holders will be. As a consequence, P3DM can be applied on moderately large areas (1000-4000 km2) at a time, although repeated exercises may result in the full coverage of small island nations. In countries covering large portion of the Earth, P3DM can and should be applied on selected “hot spots” to address specific issues.

As a follow-up to the 2006 “Mapping for Change” Conference which took place in Nairobi, the Community of Practice devoted to the improvement of Participatory GIS (PGIS) practice, developed guidelines on “Practical ethics for PGIS practitioners, facilitators, technology intermediaries and researchers” available 12 languages.

Data generation is part of the P3DM process, but not its end. Evidence has proved that as a result of the process, knowledge holders gain a deeper understanding of their bio-physical and social environments, heightened awareness on the importance of sound and climate-smart resource management and more. Data are usually generated to serve the process as the communities (all generations) learn by doing and to empower knowledge holders in interfacing with higher authorities.
Sharing of data is strategic and meant to serve purposes set by the knowledge holders. On the other hand the process allows for traditional and scientific knowledge systems to come together and make use of or build on the best of the two “worlds”.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

CTA Open Seminar: "Participatory Data: Public or Private?"

The seminar "Participatory Data: Public or Private? is organised by CTA in anticipation of the forthcoming International Open Data Day

"Within Participatory mapping processes participatory data are usually generated to serve the process itself as the communities learn by doing and to empower knowledge holders in interfacing with higher authorities. Sharing of such data is strategic and meant to serve purposes set (ideally) by the knowledge holders. On the other hand the process allows for traditional and scientific knowledge systems to come together and make use of or build on the best of the two worlds."

When? Wednesday, 21 January,  2015, 10:00 – 12:00
Where? CTA, Agro Business Park 2, 6708 Wageningen, The Netherlands;
What?: get the flyer
Who? all those interested.
How? you are free to join. Here is our location on Google Maps


Saturday, January 03, 2015

PGIS / PPGIS Community Growth updates


The PGIS/PPGIS Community of Practice is present on Dgroups since 2003, on LinkedIn since June 2008 and Facebook since May 2010.

Here are some stats about its growth:

DGroups:
# of members on 31/12/14:       2,643
Growth over the year 2014:         +3%

LinkedIn:
# of members on 31/12/14:      2,364
Growth over the year 2014:         +6%

Facebook:
# of Likes on 31/12/14:             1,428
Growth over the year 2014:        +14%

Twitter:
# of followers on 31/12/14:          611
Growth over the year 2014:        +10%

A new PGIS twitter account has been creates to report on PGIS activities run by CTA. You are welcome to follow it as well.

Be reminded that on Dgroups there are four PGIS/PPGIS communities. One for a global audience in English, and language-defined French, Spanish and Portuguese chapters. The above image shows the geographic distribution on members on the global (English) list.

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Iligan City Participatory 3D Modelling



A participatory 3D mapping (P3DM) skillshare in Iligan City, Philippines. This is a component of the Greenpeace Climate Crisis Response Project.

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Aljazeera reports on P3DM made and used in Samoa to adapt to climate change and mitigate disasters



Participatory 3D Model (P3DM) done by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) in Samoa in the framework of the GEF-Funded "Integration of climate change risk and resilience into forestry management in Samoa (ICCRIFS)" Project now in on Aljazeera news.

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Top UN officials Helen Clark and Naoko Ishii praising outcome of P3DM activities in Samoa



During the SIDS Conference which took place in Apia, Samoa, in September 2014, Ms Helen Clark, UNDP Administrator and Dr Naoko Ishii, GEF CEO & Chairperson are introduced to the Participatory 3D Model (P3DM) done by representatives from 14 villages in Lauli'i to Falevao area on Upolu Island, Western Samoa in the context of the GEF-Funded "Integration of climate change risk and resilience into forestry management in Samoa (ICCRIFS)" Project.

This short video captures some of their inspiring comments.

Credits for footage and still images: Paulo Amerika, MNRE, Samoa

Related article on the Samoa Observer Ltd.